Citizen of(from) Lund

I have recently subscribed on some of Google Groups:
soc.genealogy.nordic, soc.genealogy.german,
soc.genealogy.britain, soc.genealogy.ireland, alt.genealogy
soc.culture.baltics, soc.culture.nordic, soc.culture.europe,
soc.culture.german, soc.culture.scottish

And i have some results:

1) How citizen of Lund are called by different people on our planet:

– Hungarian (Magyar) saying about people from Lund use word: “LUNDIAK
– people from Lund saying about themselves use word: “LUNDENSARE”
Scotish (in progress) – thinking about LUNDIAN LUNDIOM or LUNDIA or LUNDIE
– German use “ein Lunder” to describe people from Lund. (Thanks charles and Tadas Blind)
– Finland’s people use “LUNDILAISET” to say about people from Lund
– in Lithuanian (Lund – LUNDiškis)
– Estonian language: people of Lund – lundLASED.
– In Latvian it would be Lundnieks or Lundaanis,

???  In English “Lundoner” means someone who is from London. – ???

2) What exactly word “Lund” means in different countries and language:
– A “lund” in Swedish is a “grove” or “coppice” in English. (thanks to Kurt F. from soc.genealogy.nordic post) – ГАЙ (укр)
– NEW word ” meadow” means “луг”
More here :
Later on, people from the Scandinavian middle classes, particularly artisans and town dwellers, adopted names in a similar fashion to that of the nobility. Family names joining two elements from nature such as the Swedish Bergman (“mountain man”), Holmberg (“island mountain”), Lindgren (“linden branch”), Sandström and Åkerlund (“field meadow“) were quite frequent and remain common today. 


– in german Lund mean Fratercula arctica (Thanks charles and Tadas Blinda)
– scotish (in progress)
– Snow is lumi in Estonian but “there was snowfall” would be “sadas lund”
– Lundy was(is) the Norse word for ‘Puffin’
– Lund in German means the bird “puffin”.
– Lund literally is Lehto in finnish
– понедельник; англ. Monday, франц. Lundi
– In Latvian “lund” word doesn’t make any sense.




PS: “Skoon” is the way that “Scone” is pronounced. Scone is the name of a place, 
and thus fairly common as a name.


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5 thoughts on “Citizen of(from) Lund

  1. http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.britain

    “Lundiak Research”

    1) How citizen of Lund are called by different people on our planet:
    “LUNDIAK” – Hungarian (Magyar) saying about people from Lund using
    this word
    “LUNDENSARE” – people from Lund saying about themselves using this
    word
    ??? How people from Scotland will say about people from Lund ??? –
    espesially this I am interested
    ??? How people from Danemark will say about people from Lund ???
    ??? How people from Norway will say about people from Lund ???
    ??? How people from Finland will say about people from Lund ???
    2) What exactly word “Lund” means in different countries and language:
    – A “lund” in Swedish is a “grove” or “coppice” in English. (thanks to
    Kurt F. from soc.genealogy.nordic post)
    – “lund” in german means deadend (тупик) (final point of road)
    ??? Does anybody know what in scotish word “lund” mean ???
    ??? Does anybody know what in danish word “lund” mean ???
    ??? Does anybody know what in norwegian word “lund” mean ???
    ??? Does anybody know what in finnish word “lund” mean ???
    3) Forms:
    During research I have discovered many forms of using word LUND. So no
    I want to know:
    People from Britain, German, Magyar, Sweden, Scotland, Other
    ??? – WHICH FORMS DO YOU HAVE in your native language with root word
    LUND an what they mean???
    Here is my possible forms:
    LUNDiak
    LUNDiac
    LUNDiack
    LUNDian
    LUNDiom
    LUNDia
    LUNDia

    ============

    Here? Ideas?

  2. Lesly Robertson:

    It does not appear in my scots or gaelic dictionaries.
    As I think I have said before, the closest appearance in the reference
    books is “Lundie” which Black's “Surnames of Scotland” says comes from
    the Perthshire village of the same name.

    Barbara Gunvaldsen:

    I have the name LUND in my Norwegian family. It means in Norwegian just the same thing: a grove of trees. Norwegians, Danes and Swedes are Germanic (not German); Finns and Hungarians are Uralic. But don't forget that Sweden held western Finland for a long time and the genealogical system in western Finland (present day Finland) is Swedish. It is not unlikely that there have been Swedish terms introduced as well.

    Peter Howard

    There is no german word 'Lund', at least not in official german language

  3. Alan Smaill from soc.culture.baltics, soc.culture.nordic, soc.culture.europe, soc.culture.german, soc.culture.scottish

    1) so if You speak Scots, so you should know how Sctottish people talk about citizen of Sweden city Lund ???

    dinnae ken nae “Lund” masel.

    2) Does scottish (scots, celtic, gaelic)language hase some sense for word “LUND” ???

    there's a wee eilan cried “Lundy” doun south, nae in Alba

  4. Renia:

    In their own languages, someone from Lund would be called:
    “someone from Lund”
    Only some towns and cities have special names for people who come from
    there.
    Lundiak sounds like a Polish name, as I said before. The “iak” part
    would mean “little”.

    Tadas Blinda:
    You know that -ak is
    a common Slavic suffix (e.g. Bosnia – Bosniak).

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